Foods to Delay

in

Foods that You Should Delay Introducing to Your Baby

When you begin giving solids to your baby, it is best to delay the introduction of certain foods until his or her system is more fully developed. This is not only because some foods may pose an allergy risk, but also because some may cause other health issues of varying kinds.

On-going research forms the basis of the following information, so it is periodically changed or updated. Check with your baby’s doctor or paediatrician for the latest recommendations – be especially cautious if there is a family history of problems or allergies.

And please note that sugar and salt are not mentioned here. However, you should not add these to your baby’s meals as he or she will be getting the tiny amounts necessary from the breast milk or formula that you are still giving. Any extra could lead to long-term health problems – and in the case of salt, to more immediate damage to your baby’s immature kidneys.

Some common foods that you should delay giving to your baby… 

  • Peanuts (also known as monkey nuts of ground nuts), and Peanut Butter: May prompt life-threatening allergic reaction. Also present a choking hazard. Introduce with extreme caution; recommendations vary from 1 year to 7 years of age, and depend on food sensitivity in the baby, and on any family history of allergy.
  • Tree nuts: May prompt life-threatening allergic reaction. Also present a choking hazard. Introduce with extreme caution; recommendations vary from 1 year to 7 years of age, and will depend on food sensitivity in your baby, and on any family history of allergy.
  • Raw Strawberries: May prompt life-threatening allergic reaction. Introduce with extreme caution after 1 year of age, but recommendations vary and will depend on food sensitivity in your baby, and on any family history of allergy.
  • Raspberries, Blackberries: Possible allergen; digestive problems. Introduce after 1 year of age, but recommendations vary and will depend on food sensitivity in your baby, and on any family history of allergy.
  • Shellfish: May prompt life-threatening allergic reaction. Introduce with extreme caution: after 1 year of age, but recommendations vary and will depend on food sensitivity in your baby, and on any family history of allergy.
  • Honey: May cause botulism if your baby is under 1 year old. Recommendations vary between 6 months and 2 years of age.
  • Citrus fruits and other acidic fruits (including tomatoes): Acids may cause digestive upsets and/or skin rashes. Introduce after 1 year, but recommendations vary from 6 months to 1 year of age.
  • Corn: Possible allergen (and not high nutritional value): Introduce after 1 year, but recommendations vary from 6 months to 1 year of age.
  • Egg white: Possible allergen (not the yolk): Introduce after 1 year, but recommendations vary from 6 months to 1 year of age – particularly whole egg in baked foods.
  • Whole milk – as a drink or replacement for breast milk or formula: Possible reaction to lactose and milk proteins. Hinders proper absorption of iron. Does not contain all the nutrients essential for healthy growth and development. Baby may have difficulty with the digestion of whole milk proteins (though yogurt and cheese are cultured, so are more easily digested). Introduce after 1 year of age – recommendations do not vary.
  • Wheat: Possible allergen, or gluten intolerance. Introduce after 10 months, but recommendations vary from 6 months to 12 months, and will depend on food sensitivity in your baby, and on any family history of allergy.
  • Grapes: Possible choking hazard. Introduce between 10 and 12 months, taking particular care.
  • Broccoli: Possible digestive upsets (wind/gas). Introduce after 6 months of age.
  • Beans: Possible digestive upsets (wind/gas). Introduce after 6 months of age.

What do you think?

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Cooked & Raw Foods

The Dirty Dozen